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Lockdown hits access to healthcare in besieged Kashmir

By Muddasir Ali, Majid Maqbool from TNH English. Published on Sep 19, 2019.

India says hospitals are functioning normally. But after weeks of restrictions, doctors and patients in Kashmir speak of increasingly long waits for treatment and medicine shortages.

Briefing: Will South Sudan make a November deadline to form a unity government?

By Sam Mednick from TNH English. Published on Sep 18, 2019.

The war may be largely over, but the fight for peace continues and much could yet happen that would reverse hard-won gains.

Why you don’t want to be a Venezuelan woman right now

By Joshua Collins from TNH English. Published on Sep 17, 2019.

With femicide and maternal mortality rates rising at home and the risk of forced rebel recruitment or sexual assault if they flee, there are no easy choices.

IOM Launches Manual on Community-Based Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergencies and Displacement

By cdangelo-martinez from News. Published on Sep 17, 2019.

Geneva— Mental health and psychosocial support are increasingly considered an essential element of humanitarian responses for populations displaced due to wars and conflicts, natural disasters, famine and poverty, and those torn by emergencies.  

Mass disruptions and displacement can bring to several sources of stress for individuals, families and communities involved. Providing psychosocial support in educational, cultural, community, religious and health settings reduces vulnerabilities, and prevents their stagnation.  

As Guglielmo Schinina, Head of Mental health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) at IOM stated, “A  community-based approach needs to inform mental health and psychosocial support in emergency and displacement situations, since it helps in addressing the collective and individual psychosocial reactions to the  adversity, building  on the existing or pre-existing strengths of affected communities, re-establishing a sense of agency and avoiding a feeling of disempowerment.”  

In line with that philosophy, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) yesterday (16/09) launched  its Manual on Community-Based Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergencies and Displacement. The Manual is presented in an interactive online version, which includes hyperlinks to complementary resources accessible at this link: https://www.iom.int/mhpsed 

“The new manual is a step forward in IOM’s efforts to build the capacity of humanitarian actors and member states in addressing the psychosocial challenges of emergencies and displacement,” affirmed Jacqueline Weekers, Head of IOM’s Migration Health Division.  

The Manual is the fruit of two years’ labor as research, review and field testing, involving more than 100 professionals, practitioners, academics and humanitarian actors from IOM, other international organizations, NGOs, local initiatives and communities of practices.  

The main aim of the manual is to provide those responsible for MHPSS in emergencies with a reference document that can help them in the practical implementation of their activities with a community-based approach.  

Some of the activities aimed at strengthening the social fabric and helping people overcome their distress described in the manual include sociocultural, artistic, and educational programs and workshops, sport and play, rituals and celebrations, counselling and clinical and social support for those with severe mental disorders.  

The manual describes ways to integrate mental health and psychosocial support in other activities, like livelihood support, protection of vulnerable cases, and conflict transformation.       

About IOM MHPSS 

The IOM is committed to the principle that humane and orderly migration benefits migrants and society. IOM has been active in psychosocial support for decades, by developing interventions, trainings and research projects in more than 70 countries worldwide. IOM MHPSS activities are supervised by a dedicated Mental Health, Psychosocial Response and Intercultural Communication Section. 

For more information please contact: Mental Health, Psychosocial Response and Intercultural Communication - Global, contactpss@iom.int 

 

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Tuesday, September 17, 2019 - 11:53
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Self-portrait elaborated by a Nigerian IDP and psychosocial worker, during a five-day workshop on autobiographical models through art, organized by IOM in Maiduguri, Nigeria @IOM 2018/Rola Soulheil.

Art workshop. Psychosocial Mobile Teams. Gubio IDP camp, Maiduguri, Nigeria @IOM 2018.

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IOM Launches Manual on Community-Based Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergencies and Displacement

By Itayi Viriri from News. Published on Sep 17, 2019.

Geneva— Mental health and psychosocial support are increasingly considered an essential element of humanitarian responses for populations displaced due to wars and conflicts, natural disasters, famine and poverty, and those torn by emergencies.  

Mass disruptions and displacement can bring to several sources of stress for individuals, families and communities involved. Providing psychosocial support in educational, cultural, community, religious and health settings reduces vulnerabilities, and prevents their stagnation.  

As Guglielmo Schinina, Head of Mental health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) at IOM stated, “A  community-based approach needs to inform mental health and psychosocial support in emergency and displacement situations, since it helps in addressing the collective and individual psychosocial reactions to the  adversity, building  on the existing or pre-existing strengths of affected communities, re-establishing a sense of agency and avoiding a feeling of disempowerment.”  

In line with that philosophy, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) yesterday (16/09) launched  its Manual on Community-Based Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergencies and Displacement. The Manual is presented in an interactive online version, which includes hyperlinks to complementary resources accessible at this link: https://www.iom.int/mhpsed 

“The new manual is a step forward in IOM’s efforts to build the capacity of humanitarian actors and member states in addressing the psychosocial challenges of emergencies and displacement,” affirmed Jacqueline Weekers, Director of IOM’s Migration Health Division.  

The Manual is the fruit of two years’ labor as research, review and field testing, involving more than 100 professionals, practitioners, academics and humanitarian actors from IOM, other international organizations, NGOs, local initiatives and communities of practices.  

The main aim of the manual is to provide those responsible for MHPSS in emergencies with a reference document that can help them in the practical implementation of their activities with a community-based approach.  

Some of the activities aimed at strengthening the social fabric and helping people overcome their distress described in the manual include sociocultural, artistic, and educational programs and workshops, sport and play, rituals and celebrations, counselling and clinical and social support for those with severe mental disorders.  

The manual describes ways to integrate mental health and psychosocial support in other activities, like livelihood support, protection of vulnerable cases, and conflict transformation.       

About IOM MHPSS 

The IOM is committed to the principle that humane and orderly migration benefits migrants and society. IOM has been active in psychosocial support for decades, by developing interventions, trainings and research projects in more than 70 countries worldwide. IOM MHPSS activities are supervised by a dedicated Mental Health, Psychosocial Response and Intercultural Communication Section. 

For more information please contact: Mental Health, Psychosocial Response and Intercultural Communication - Global, contactpss@iom.int 

 

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Tuesday, September 17, 2019 - 17:47
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Self-portrait elaborated by a Nigerian IDP and psychosocial worker, during a five-day workshop on autobiographical models through art, organized by IOM in Maiduguri, Nigeria. Photo: IOM/Rola Soulheil. 

 Art workshop with Psychosocial Mobile Teams at Gubio IDP camp, Maiduguri, Nigeria. Photo: IOM 2018. 

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Syrian deportations leave behind hardship, fear in Lebanon

By Kareem Chehayeb, Abby Sewell from TNH English. Published on Sep 17, 2019.

Lebanese authorities have forcibly deported thousands across the border to war-torn Syria. For the family members of those sent back, it’s a trying time.

Survivors of Shipwreck off Cameroon Return to Burkina Faso

By jcborlongan from News. Published on Sep 17, 2019.

Ouagadougou – Fifty-nine Burkinabe migrants who survived a shipwreck off Kribi, Cameroon in late July, finally returned home last week (12/09). The migrants who flew out of Douala, Cameroon, were welcomed at the international airport in Ouagadougou by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the Government of Burkina Faso with support from the European Union. 

The 59 Burkinabe were among 117 people, along with 32 Ghanaians and 26 Togolese, stranded in high seas after their boat ran out of fuel on 29-30 July, after departing from Cotonou, Benin. 

After their rescue, Cameroonian local and administrative authorities together with local communities provided support to the destitute migrants stranded and enabled their access to basic services. 

Following a request from the Honorary Consulate of Burkina Faso to IOM Cameroon, the stranded survivors who had no means to cover their return-related costs received voluntary return assistance. The shipwreck survivors from Togo and Burkina Faso also returned home on 12 September on a flight chartered by IOM under the Regional Direct Assistance Fund (RDAF) of the EU-IOM Joint Initiative for Migrant Protection and Reintegration.  

The RDAF established in 2019 by IOM is a flexible and timely facility to address urgent and unforeseen protection and assistance needs of migrants stranded along migration routes in West and Central Africa and who originate from within the region.  

“While the media tend to cover exclusively African migration to Europe, our data reveal that more than 70 per cent of migrants move within the West African region,” said Andreas De Boer, Programme Officer at IOM Burkina Faso. “These migrants face great vulnerability in the region. Return and reintegration assistance is essential to give them the possibility of starting over, and we commend the Government of Burkina Faso for its great commitment to addressing this issue,” he added.  

In this instance, RDAF support included the transportation of the Kribi shipwreck survivors and provision of their temporary accommodation in Cameroon, medical and food assistance, and assisted voluntary return to their countries of origin. Reintegration assistance as well as medical, social and psychosocial support will be provided to Burkinabe returnees, including the most vulnerable returnees such as minors who will be assisted by UNICEF and Action Sociale. 

The EU-IOM Joint Initiative for Migrant Protection and Reintegration funded by the European Union Emergency Trust Fund for Africa and implemented by IOM was launched in 2017 in 13 countries in West and Central Africa to assist migrants stranded along migration routes, including the Mediterranean routes. 

For more information, please contact Andreas De Boer at IOM Burkina Faso, Tel: +226 74 93 81 28, Email: adeboer@iom.int 

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Tuesday, September 17, 2019 - 14:15
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59 survivors of a shipwreck were assisted to return to Burkina Faso. Photo: IOM 

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IOM’s African Capacity Building Centre Celebrates 10th Anniversary

By jcborlongan from News. Published on Sep 17, 2019.

Geneva – The International Organization for Migration’s African Capacity Building Centre for Migration Management (ACBC) celebrated its 10th Anniversary in Geneva last week (13/09). 

Attended by representatives from IOM’s African Member States, donors, partners and IOM colleagues, the occasion also served as a launch of one the ACBC’s latest initiatives, the Passport Examination Procedure Mobile Application (PEPM 2.0 App). The app will assist state immigration authorities in better managing travel document security particularly in remote border postings, thus contributing to increased cross-border and traveller facilitation, protection and security. 

Since autumn 2009, the ACBC is hosted by the United Republic of Tanzania within the premises of the Tanzanian Regional Immigration Training Academy (TRITA) in the city of Moshi, located at the foothills of Mount Kilimanjaro. In his opening remarks, Maurice Ketenusa, Commander of TRITA, reiterated Tanzania’s continued strong support for the ACBC and his appreciation for the professional and tireless work of the Centre’s staff.  

The Centre contributes positively and practically to key policy and programming directions as set out by its Member States, the African Union (AU) (including the AU’s Protocol on the Free Movement of Persons), the various African Regional Economic Communities (RECs) such as ECOWAS, SADEC or the EAC, the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the 2018 Global Compact of Migration (GCM) or the International Civil Aviation Organisation’s (ICAO) Traveller Identification Programme (TRIP). 

Since 2009, the initial thematic focus of the ACBC has been put on tailored, often quite technical trainings in the thematic field of immigration and border management. Over the last years this thematic focus has been broadened to include other key migration management areas such as migration and health (notably health at borders), migration and development (notably border management and development/trade), as well as labour migration, climate change and migration, or migrant protection and assistance.   

Nelson Goncalves, manager of the ACBC, presented the Centre’s achievements over the last 10 years: 241 trainings were carried out across Africa and 6,500 immigration officers from around the entire continent trained. The trainees include 40 certified ACBC trainers (following the concept of ‘training of trainers’). Trainings by the ACBC were and continue being regularly conducted in the major languages spoken of the continent, i.e., Arabic, English, French and Portuguese, as well as in Kiswahili, a major language spoken widely especially in Eastern Africa. 

Since its creation, the ACBC has further consistently focused in its work on supporting immigration officials with the responsible use of new technology. This includes a strong effort on supporting member states to fulfil their obligations as regards human rights and privacy/personal data protection. The new PEPM 2.0 App was developed with financial support from the Kingdom of the Netherlands and the Italian Development Cooperation. It complements the well-established ACBC training manual and course Passport Examination Procedures Manual (PEPM) 2.0.    In his presentation, Deputy Director Riks from the Dutch Ministry of Justice and Security underlined the need for international cooperation in the migration management field. 

In her contribution, Marietta Muwanga-Ssevume, IOM’s Chief Information Officer and Director of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) underlined the steadily increasing importance of advanced IT technology and systems to better meet the needs and growing demands in the field of migration and border management: “There is a great potential that the responsible use of new technology offers to better support migrants in a globalized world – IOM is strongly committed to further strengthen its efforts in this field,” she said.  

Dr. Qasim Sufi, Chief of Mission of IOM Tanzania underlined the Centre’s value, saying, “The ACBC is there to assist IOM’s African Member States through practical and technical trainings and support. Global developments especially in the technical field are gaining in speed and most countries around the world do need support to harness the benefits of such rapid development while eliminating or mitigating associated risks.” He added, “The ACBC should serve as a good example for other regions in the world.”  

Florian G. Forster, IOM’s Head of Immigration and Border Management highlighted the importance of practical, technical trainings provided by the Centre. “Such hands-on trainings for immigration officials from members states are really key for being able to effectively operationalize and rollout wider policy frameworks and achieve their objectives,” he said. 

For more information, please contact IOM ACBC, Nelson Goncalves, Tel: +255 688 700 090, Email: ngoncalves@iom.int, or Melissa Tui, Tel: +255 745 919 355, Email: mtui@iom.int 

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Tuesday, September 17, 2019 - 14:10
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IOM’s African Capacity Building Centre celebrates its 10th anniversary. Photo: IOM   

Dr. Qasim Sufi, IOM Chief of Mission in Tanzania, where the ACBC is located. Photo: IOM 

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Job Fair in Côte d’Ivoire Promotes Reintegration of 350 Returned Migrants

By jcborlongan from News. Published on Sep 17, 2019.

Abidjan – The International Organization for Migration (IOM) has assisted over 5,250 stranded Ivorians to voluntarily return to Côte d’Ivoire over the past three years, from countries such as Libya, Niger and Morocco. Despite the logistical difficulties, the journey home turned out to be the easy part. 

The returned migrants face the challenge of reintegrating themselves into their former communities.  They can face rejection, the stigma of unemployment and the shame of returning empty handed. 

To mitigate these challenges, more than 2,000 returning migrants have received reintegration assistance through trainings and income-generating activities through initiatives supported by the European Union Emergency Trust Fund for Africa (EUTF). 

It is in this regard that last week, IOM hosted a job and training fair organized for returned migrants in Côte d’Ivoire. About 350 young men and women attended. 

The event targeted Ivorians who returned home between 2017 and 2019 under IOM’s Assisted Voluntary Return (AVR) programme as part of the EU-IOM Joint Initiative for Migrant Protection and Reintegration.  

“Thanks to this fair, I realized that I had not been abandoned. I have chosen three reintegration projects that will facilitate my reintegration into society. I will do my best to have a better future in Côte d’Ivoire, instead of risking my life in the Mediterranean or in the desert. If ever I must go to Europe, I will use the legal channels, and I will go to visit and return to my country,” said Moussa, one of the young returned migrants who visited the fair. 

During the three-day job fair, 22 IOM partners presented participants with a wide range of available job opportunities covering various fields including construction, poultry and transport. The posts are being offered across Côte d’Ivoire, in the capital, Abidjan, as well as in Bouaké, Daloa, Man, Gagnoa, San-Pédro and Korhogo. 

Former beneficiaries of the assistance shared their experiences and advice. IOM also assisted some of the participants in designing a sustainable professional project tailored to their profile and aspirations. 

“We are happy to participate in this fair which gives these returned migrants a second chance for reintegration in their country of origin. It was an opportunity for us to showcase all our activities so that they can define their own future,” said Hyppolite Kakou, from the National Agency for Vocational Training (AGEFOP), an IOM partner. 

Based on the beneficiaries’ needs and skills, reintegration projects can be individual, collective (provided to several returned migrants as a group) or community-based, i.e., involving returned migrants together with community members.  

At the fair’s conclusion, all participants were encouraged to submit their professional goals for review and register with IOM’s partners. They were also able to participate in several side activities such as dialogues on female entrepreneurship and the challenges of reintegration. Participants also attended therapeutic/ creative workshops in theatre, slam and art therapy.  

“The participants expressed themselves freely in a judgement-free space. They need intensive follow-up, and some need to be listened to. Since their arrival, they wanted to discuss, express themselves, share their experiences and their journey. In art therapy, we stimulate a lot creativity and speaking,” said Souhad, an art therapist.  

This event was funded by the European Union under the EU-IOM Joint Initiative for Migrant Protection and Reintegration. 

IOM’s efforts were supported by the Government of Côte d’Ivoire, represented at the job fair by several State structures, including the Directorate General for Ivorians Abroad (DGIE), Child Protection Directorate (DPE), Youth Employment Agency (AEJ), National Agency for Vocational Training (AGEFOP), and National Agency for Support to Rural Development (ANADER). These reintegration programmes are implemented jointly by IOM Côte d’Ivoire and its various partners, state structures, civil society organizations and private sector actors. 

For more information, please contact Lavinia Prati, IOM Côte d’Ivoire, Tel: +225 80 07 01 27, Email: lprati@iom.int 

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Tuesday, September 17, 2019 - 14:05
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Over 350 participants attended the first job fair for returned migrants in Côte d’Ivoire. Photo: IOM/Mohamed Diabate 

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IOM Strengthens Engagement of Diaspora Organizations in Disaster Response, Preparedness and Recovery

By jcborlongan from News. Published on Sep 17, 2019.

Washington, DC – The International Organization for Migration (IOM) last week (13-14/09) held training sessions for Bangladeshi, Haitian and Filipino diaspora organizations during which participants focused on safer shelter in disaster response, preparedness and recovery. 

The frequency and intensity of natural disasters force more people to flee their homes every day. Recent events like Hurricane Dorian earlier this month serve as a stark reminder of the need to rebuild more disaster-resilient shelters to help prevent or reduce displacement associated with natural hazards. 

In the wake of a crisis, only 15 to 20 per cent of shelter needs are typically met by the international community. Those affected are ultimately left to rebuild their homes, often relying on aid, money and volunteers from the diaspora. 

“The diaspora has proven in many countries to be some of the largest players in responses,” said Joseph Ashmore, IOM Shelters and Settlements Specialist. “Contributions through diaspora groups can be larger than the entire inter-agency response in some places.” 

The training is part of a larger project funded by the US Agency for International Development’s Office of US Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA). Recognizing the critical role of the diaspora, the project also aims to inform the diaspora about existing coordination mechanisms in the field of disaster response and shelters and explore linkages with these systems. 

The Haitian Diaspora Emergency Response Unit (HDREU) is already an example of a more coordinated and effective disaster response, within the diaspora and between diaspora and other stakeholders. The coalition of more than 30 diaspora organizations is currently mobilizing resources to better support the needs of communities impacted by Hurricane Dorian in the Bahamas.  

“[With] each disaster we should be getting better, not worse,” said Magalie Emile-Backer, co-founder of the Haiti Renewal Alliance, one of the lead organizations of the HDREU. “These trainings will empower us with more knowledge on how to build back safer to be able to train our communities and ensure that we mitigate the next one because we know it is coming.” 

Presenters for this workshop included representatives from IOM, OFDA, InterAction, World Bank, University of the Philippines Alumni Association of San Francisco, Haiti Renewal Alliance and UDION Foundation. 

Last year, trainings were held in Washington, San Francisco and Miami. Additional workshops will be held in New York, Boston and Houston in the coming months. 

For more information, please contact Liz Lizama at IOM Washington, Tel: +1 202 716 8820, Email: elizama@iom.int 

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Tuesday, September 17, 2019 - 14:03
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Luca Dall’Oglio, IOM Chief of Mission in Washington DC, welcomes attendees to the Build Back Safer training last week (13/09) in Washington. Photo: IOM/Liz Lizama 

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Haitians fear deportation from Bahamas after storm disaster

By Paisley Dodds from TNH English. Published on Sep 16, 2019.

Undocumented and exposed, Haitian migrants are facing even more uncertainty after Hurricane Dorian.

New suspects, ongoing abuses, and the Rohingya purge: Key takeaways from Myanmar rights probe

By Irwin Loy from TNH English. Published on Sep 16, 2019.

Investigators say they’ve widened the net to uncover fresh evidence of crimes against the Rohingya and other minorities. But accountability is elusive as the UN-mandated mission comes to an end.

Child Immigration Detention is Not Only Wrong, It Is Ineffective

By cdangelo-martinez from News. Published on Sep 16, 2019.

United Nations Network on Migration, 16th September 2019

➢ Today, the United Nations Network on Migration strongly reiterates its position that child immigration detention must be ended in every region of the world. Detention of children for immigration purposes - whether they are traveling alone or with their families – has been recognized as a child rights violation and can be highly damaging to their physical and psychological health and wellbeing. Detention of children based on their migratory status is thus never in their best interests. Community-based programmes, case management and other human rights-based alternatives have proven highly effective and all governments should work to replace immigration detention for children and families with appropriate reception and care arrangements.

➢ Studies consistently show that detention and family separation are traumatic experiences that have a profound negative impact on children’s health and long-term cognitive and physical development. This harm can occur even when the detention is of short duration, regardless of the conditions in which children are held, and even when children are detained with their families. Children in detention are at risk of suffering depression, anxiety, and psychosomatic problems such as insomnia and nightmares. Recent reports from around the world consistently and repeatedly illustrate how damaging detention is for children. The Committee on the Rights of the Child and the Committee on Migrant Workers also issued authoritative guidance in 2017 affirming that “children should never be detained for reasons related to their or their parents’ migration status and States should expeditiously and completely cease or eradicate the immigration detention of children”.

➢ Many governments that are implementing appropriate reception and care arrangements as alternatives to detention for children and families have found them to be more cost-effective and to result in low rates of absconding and high rates of compliance with status determination processes, including removal orders. Keeping families together over the course of immigration proceedings does not necessitate detention. This is a false choice. Detention is expensive and burdensome to administer, and there is no evidence that it deters individuals from migrating or claiming asylum.

➢ This is an important moment to recall the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration, where Member States committed to “protect and respect the rights and best interests of the child at all times, regardless of migration status, by ensuring availability and accessibility of a viable range of alternatives to detention in non-custodial contexts, favouring community-based care arrangements that ensure access to education and healthcare and respect their right to family life and family unity, and by working to end the practice of child detention in the context of international migration.” In the context of asylum, the same commitment is made in the Global Compact on Refugees.
➢ The United Nations organizations that make up the Network are supporting governments in all regions to tackle these issues in a humane way, in accordance with international human rights and labour standards, to put in place viable non-custodial and community-based alternatives to immigration detention that are in line with international law, to keep families together, and to ensure that the best interests of every child always take precedence in immigration and asylum proceedings.

For media enquiries, please contact:
UNICEF
Christopher Tidey, Communications Specialist for Emergencies, UNICEF New York
+1 917 340 3017
ctidey@unicef.org

IOM
Leonard Doyle
Director, Media and Communication Division Spokesperson of the Director General
+41 22 717 95 89 ldoyle@iom.int or media@iom.int

OHCHR
Ravina Shamdasani
OHCHR Deputy Spokesperson
+41 22 917 9169 rshamdasani@ohchr.org

 

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Monday, September 16, 2019 - 11:52
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Nigeria’s child detainees, Myanmar’s ‘out of control’ military, and a ‘safe zone’ in Syria: The Cheat Sheet

By from TNH English. Published on Sep 13, 2019.

A weekly read to keep you in the loop on humanitarian issues.

Roundup: Migration, displacement, and Afghanistan’s interlocking crises

By from TNH English. Published on Sep 13, 2019.

A collection of our reporting exploring the complex road ahead as civilian conflict casualties rise and humanitarian access shrinks.

Appeal Launched for Humanitarian Response to Cyclone Devastation in Mozambique

By jcborlongan from News. Published on Sep 13, 2019.

Maputo – With Mozambique devastated by drought, flooding and Cyclones Idai and Kenneth in the past several months, humanitarian partners yesterday (12/09) launched the revised Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) requesting over USD 397 million to support affected populations.  

The HRP – which comes six months after Cyclone Idai made landfall and was shortly followed by Cyclone Kenneth – targets 2 million of the 2.5 million people who need life-saving assistance, to deal with challenges including food insecurity, inadequate shelter, lack of health services, poor infrastructure, and recovery from drought. If funded the appeal will cover identified priority needs through May 2020. 

The International Organization for Migration (IOM) portion of the HRP request is for USD 33.7 million to assist over 877,000 cyclone-affected individuals and expand IOM programming in Shelter, Health, Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM), Protection, and Coordination, all areas essential to the post-cyclone recovery process.  

More than 500,000 people are still living in houses that were severely damaged by the cyclones (over 280,000 homes were damaged or destroyed). This is especially concerning, as the onset of the rainy season is expected next month. 

As recorded by IOM’s Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM), the total number of displaced people in resettlement sites following the two cyclones is nearly 94,000 individuals – Idai an estimated 83,457 individuals and Kenneth, 10,536 individuals.  

“Following Cyclones Idai and Kenneth, critical humanitarian needs continue across the country – especially for health, shelter, and infrastructure repair. Many families remain living in tents and damaged homes that may not stand up to the rainy season, let alone the next cyclone season,” said IOM Mozambique Chief of Mission Katharina Schnoering.  

“Families who recently moved to resettlement sites need support to build stable shelters, access health and education services, and establish their livelihoods. Without funding, families will suffer ongoing exposure to a number of risks to their health and safety.”  

Edwina, a resident of a resettlement site in Sofala Province, lost her home and entire neighbourhood due to flooding in Nhamatanda district and cannot return. “As a widow and mother of four, I feel very vulnerable. I need a better house because I’m scared that my tent may fall in the coming days due to heavy rains.”  

She continued, “I also need materials to make and sell doughnuts at the market as I did before the cyclone. I need cake flour, cooking oil, sugar, yeast. This would really make me independent again.

Over 500,000 individuals have received various shelter and essential household items from IOM in Sofala, Manica and Cabo Delgado provinces and humanitarian partners. Additional shelter material is needed to repair houses and reinforce tents before the raining season; according to the HRP, 620,000 individuals need shelter and NFI support.  

For more information please contact:  

IOM: Sandra Black, Tel: +258 852 162 278, Email: sblack@iom.int  

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Friday, September 13, 2019 - 15:40
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Tratara resettlement site in Cabo Delgado, hosting nearly 150 families who were displaced following Cyclone Kenneth. Site improvements are required to mitigate risks ahead of the next rainy and cyclone season.  

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In Bahamas Recovery, IOM Takes Lead on Shelter Coordination

By jcborlongan from News. Published on Sep 13, 2019.

Nassau – The International Organization for Migration (IOM) has taken the lead, alongside the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), to assist the Ministry of Social Services and Urban Renewal with shelter coordination and management.   

Through the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA), the Government has taken the responsibility of coordinating the emergency response from its Nassau-based National Emergency Operations Centre (NEOC).  

Last week, an emergency support function (ESF) humanitarian coordination structure was developed and is made up of 13 ESFs.  Each of these have their own lead Government ministries and departments and are paired with UN agencies to implement activities.  

“IOM has been partnered directly with ESF-6, which deals with mass care and shelter and is led by officials of the Ministry of Social Services,” explained Vynliz Dailey, the IOM Communications Officer.  

Thousands of Bahamian residents displaced after Hurricane Dorian are being housed in gymnasiums, schools, churches and other emergency shelters while the Government and humanitarian partners move quickly to identify more durable, longer term housing solutions.  

Through almost daily meetings with government officials and other humanitarian agencies and partners, solutions to the gaps identified regarding non-food item (NFI) distribution, communication, shelter capacity and protection issues, among others, are being identified. By the end of this week, IOM expects to submit a list of recommendations to ESF-6 to address the matters at hand. 

“It’s going to take a lot of effort and coordination with many stakeholders to get the people into more suitable accommodations,” said IOM Team Leader, Jan-Willem Wegdam. “IOM has been given the responsibility to support those efforts and we are more than happy to assist. On the ground all the agencies are willing to collaborate with us and are dedicated to doing the work we have been tasked to do.”  

As of 10 September 2019, NEMA reported 2,043 people registered in shelters in New Providence alone, which includes many Haitian migrants. At that time a total of six shelters were in use. That number is expected to change as people continue to be evacuated from the affected islands to Nassau. An IOM Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) expert based in Haiti has been deployed and will begin DTM assessments with multi-agency teams in the coming days.   

Meantime, with support from a local partner, IOM has distributed most of the 1,000 tarpaulins delivered to Marsh Harbour Port, Marsh Harbour – Abaco, on 10 September 2019.  Distributions were supervised by IOM’s Head of Community Stabilization Unit from Washington DC, Brian Kelly, stationed in Abaco, who is also leading the UN Disaster Assessment and Coordination team in that area.  

For more information please contact Jorge Gallo at the IOM Regional Office for Central America, North America and the Caribbean, Tel: +506 7203 6536, Email: jgallo@iom.int 

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Friday, September 13, 2019 - 15:35
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On Tuesday (09/10) IOM, along with other agencies sat to tailor the DTM survey to the Bahamas emergency. Photo: IOM/Vynliz Dailey

IOM Team Leader, Jan-Willem Wegdam contributing to the daily partners meeting hosted by NEWA and the Government of Bahamas. Photo: IOM/Vynliz Dailey

IOM Team Leader, Jan-Willem Wegdam contributing to the daily partners meeting hosted by NEWA and the Government of Bahamas. Photo: IOM/Vynliz Dailey

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IOM Returns 127 Stranded Migrants Safely to 15 Countries Across Africa, Asia

By jcborlongan from News. Published on Sep 13, 2019.

Misrata, Libya – This week (10/09), the International Organization for Migration (IOM) assisted 127 stranded migrants – 103 men, 14 women and 10 children – to return to their homelands via a charter flight under IOM’s Voluntary Humanitarian Return programme, or VHR. Many of them had already spent months, even years enduring difficult conditions in Libya.  

This flight, as well as others this year, were made possible thanks to the EU-IOM Joint Initiative for Migrant Protection and Reintegration implemented by IOM. 

The migrants departed from Misrata and Tripoli making their way to 15 different countries of origin in either Africa or Asia. Due to the current conflict in Tripoli and the closure of Mitiga airport after being targeted by multiple airstrikes over the past few months, IOM coordinated with Libya’s Directorate for Combating Illegal Migration (DCIM), ensuring the migrants safely departed the Misrata Airport, east of Tripoli. Passengers flew to Istanbul, where they boarded continuing flights to their final destinations.  

“Providing stranded migrants wishing to return home with a safe and dignified way to do so is one of our main priorities, especially amid the escalation of the conflict in the capital, Tripoli,” said Ashraf Hassan, IOM Libya Operations Officer, who added: “This complex operation took real coordination between 15 IOM missions.” 

Indeed, these men, women and children set out for an array of destinations stretching in a chain reaching over 10,000 kms from Africa to South Asia. For that, IOM also coordinated with consular officials and other national authorities.  

Within Libya, amid an increasingly challenging security situation, IOM continues to provide safe passage for migrants stranded in the country and who wish to return home. So far in 2019, over 7,200 stranded migrants have left with IOM’s assistance. Returnees reached Tuesday’s charter from Misrata after three other movements by both land and air. Some arrived on a charter flight from Zwara. Others came by bus from Tripoli and surrounding areas.  

A young mother, Amina, said: “Today we get to see our family again. I plan to go back to school, finish my studies, and take care of my boy.” 

Prior to the migrants’ departure, IOM teams screened for vulnerability screenings and completed medical assessments to assure all passengers were fit for travel. 

For medical cases and unaccompanied minors, IOM provides operational escorts. Migrants received hot meals and refreshments prior to boarding, also clothing and hygiene kits. 

On Wednesday (11/09), IOM Libya continued to assist other migrants returning home by organizing an additional charter for 158 Nigerian migrants bound from the Misrata airport for Lagos. Migrants on that flight travelled from Tripoli to the airport, for which they received security escorted land transportation. 

For more information on IOM’s VHR programme, please access this link

For more information, please contact:  

In Geneva: Joel Millman, Tel: +41 79 103 8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int  or Safa Msehli, Tel: +410766133175, Email: smsehli@iom.int  

In Libya: Ashraf Hassan, Tel: +216 29 794707, Email: ashassan@iom.int  

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Friday, September 13, 2019 - 15:30
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Returning migrants boarding the plane from Misrata, Libya. Photo: IOM/Moayad Zaghdani

IOM staff assisting migrants at the airport in Misrata, Libya. Photo: IOM/Juma Ben Hassan

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Oxfam faces $160 million legal threat over Palestine aid project

By Ben Parker from TNH English. Published on Sep 12, 2019.

The US government is staying on the sidelines in the latest counter-terror case brought against non-profits working in Palestine. But five more filings are in the works.

From Ebola to Kunduz: MSF head Joanne Liu looks back

By Ben Parker from TNH English. Published on Sep 12, 2019.

A wide-ranging exit interview with MSF’s international president touching on Game of Thrones, ‘humanitarian divas’, and plenty in between.

As Lesvos Battles Migration Crisis Fatigue, the Value of Centralized Migration Decision-Making Is Questioned

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Sep 11, 2019.

As Greece's Aegean islands continue to grapple with migrants arriving on their shores, decisions regarding the needs of newcomers are negotiated in Brussels and Athens, far removed from the situation on the ground. Meanwhile, local communities have had successes in hosting migrants, as this article drawing on observations from the hospitality center and refugee camp on Lesvos explores.

MPI Europe Sets Strong Future Course with Selection of New Director and Research Director

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Sep 09, 2019.

BRUSSELS — Migration Policy Institute Europe’s administrative council has selected Dr. Hanne Beirens as the respected think tank’s new director, tapping a leader with a proven track record in the research, public policy and project management realms.

Beirens, who has served as MPI Europe’s acting director in recent months and has been with the organisation as associate director since 2015, was selected from a pool of highly qualified candidates who emerged during an intensive and open search process.

The Multicultural Dilemma: Amid Rising Diversity and Unsettled Equity Issues, New Zealand Seeks to Address Its Past and Present

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Sep 04, 2019.

New Zealand drew global attention for its unity and support for the Muslim community targeted during the horrific Christchurch attacks. Yet the country's road to inclusion has been far from straightforward, and amid rising diversity it is grappling with the best way to achieve inclusion for its multiethnic population, including indigenous Māori peoples and migrants. This article outlines the opportunities and challenges to fostering multiculturalism against a backdrop of bicultural policies.

Effectively Serving Immigrant and Dual Language Learner Families through Home Visiting Programs

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 29, 2019.

Marking a policy brief's release, this webinar explores the promise of home visiting services that support new parents alongside their infants and toddlers, plus strategies for improving how these programs work with immigrant and linguistically diverse families.

Brazilian Immigrants in the United States

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 28, 2019.

Approximately 450,000 Brazilian immigrants resided in the United States in 2017, an increase of nearly one-third since 2010. Representing 1 percent of the nation's 44.5 million immigrants, Brazilians tend to have higher educational attainment and household incomes compared to the overall foreign-born population. Get the latest data on Brazilians immigrants, including flows over time, geographic distribution, and more in this Spotlight.

Effectiveness of Home Visiting Programs in Reaching Infants and Toddlers in Immigrant & DLL Families Can Be Improved

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 23, 2019.

WASHINGTON – Home visiting programs, which serve expecting and new parents alongside their infants and toddlers, have proven to be an effective model to support maternal health and well-being as well as children’s health and socioemotional development, particularly for at-risk families.

Leveraging the Potential of Home Visiting Programs to Serve Immigrant and Dual Language Learner Families

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 22, 2019.

Home visiting programs for young families are growing in popularity across the United States, and have demonstrated their effectiveness in supporting maternal health and child well-being. At the same time, more infants and toddlers are growing up in immigrant families and households where a language other than English is spoken. Why then are these children under-represented in these programs? This brief explores common barriers, ways to address them, and why it is important to do so.

A Tightening Grip Abroad: Authoritarian Regimes Target Their Emigrant and Diaspora Communities

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 21, 2019.

Authoritarian states have long attempted to restrict citizens’ movement. But what happens when their reach extends beyond their borders? The October 2018 assassination of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi brought into sharp relief the long arm of these regimes in reaching citizens abroad. This phenomenon, “transnational authoritarianism,” further shows that the relationship between migration and authoritarianism is becoming more complex.

Chronicling Migration in the 21st Century Through One Family’s Journey

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 21, 2019.

Marking the launch of New York Times reporter Jason DeParle's book tracing the arc of migration and its impacts through the life of an extended family of Filipino migrants over a three-decade period, from Manila and through Dubai to the Houston area, this conversation with MPI's Andrew Selee and the World Bank's Dilip Ratha explores migration at both a global and very personal level.

As U.S. Labor Force Growth Slows, Immigration Can Bolster Economic Growth & Help Fill Skills Gaps

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 15, 2019.

WASHINGTON — Clouds hover over what has been a strong U.S. economy, with long-run projections significantly less bright because the U.S. labor market is being reshaped by forces such as aging of the workforce, the lowest rate of population growth since the 1940s and emerging gaps between the skills employers seek and those workers possess. As these trends intensify, globalization and automation also are likely to dramatically transform how and where work is done.

Rethinking U.S. Immigration Policy: Building a Responsive, Effective Immigration System

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 15, 2019.

This discussion marked the launch of MPI's Rethinking U.S. Immigration Policy Initiative, which aims to generate a big-picture, evidence-driven vision of the role immigration should play in America’s future, as well as to build a bipartisan center so needed reforms can be enacted. The initiative's leader, MPI Senior Fellow Doris Meissner, joins in conversation with former Bush administration Commerce Secretary Carlos Gutierrez and former Obama White House Domestic Policy Council Director Cecilia Muñoz about the prospects for action and what's needed.

What Role Can Immigration Play in Supporting U.S. Economic Growth as the Labor Market Is Transformed by Major Forces? New MPI Brief Assesses

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 14, 2019.

WASHINGTON – Major changes in demographics, automation and alternative staffing will dramatically transform the U.S. labor market over the next few decades. A shrinking native-born workforce, baby boomer retirements, tech-driven innovation but also job displacement, and increases in contracted and outsourced labor, among other trends, will have significant effects on the U.S. economy. What role can immigration play in mitigating undesirable outcomes and supporting U.S. economic growth and competitiveness?

Effectively Serving Immigrant and Dual Language Learner Families through Home Visiting Programs

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 13, 2019.

Inmigrantes centroamericanos en los Estados Unidos

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 12, 2019.

Si bien se ha prestado mucha atención a los centroamericanos recién llegados a la frontera entre los Estados Unidos y México, casi la mitad de los aproximadamente 3.5 millones que vivían en los Estados Unidos en 2017 llegaron antes de 2000. Aproximadamente un tercio son ciudadanos estadounidenses y tienden a participar en la fuerza laboral con más frecuencia que otros extranjeros y estadounidenses. Descubra más en este artículo lleno de datos.

Central American Immigrants in the United States

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 12, 2019.

While much attention has been paid to recent Central American arrivals at the U.S.-Mexico border, nearly half of the approximately 3.5 million Central Americans resident in the United States in 2017 arrived before 2000. About one-third are naturalized U.S. citizens, and they tend to participate in the labor force at a higher rate than foreign- and U.S.-born adults. Discover more about this population in this data-rich article.

How Does Immigration Fit into the Future of the U.S. Labor Market?

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 08, 2019.

The U.S. economy is facing an uncertain future as an aging workforce, stagnating labor force participation, skill mismatches, and automation reshape the labor market. This issue brief explores these forces and the role that immigration could play in supporting future U.S. economic growth. It also examines how immigration affects workers already in the country, both native born and immigrant.

Immigration and the U.S. Labor Market: A Look Ahead

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 08, 2019.

In the coming decades, the U.S. labor market will undergo major transformation. Automation, an aging workforce, and alternative staffing practices will change how, where, and by whom work is done. This think piece, by a former chief economist for the U.S. Labor Department, explores how immigrant workers fit into this changing landscape, and what immigration and workforce policy changes could help maximize their contributions to the U.S. economy.

Millions Will Feel Chilling Effects of U.S. Public-Charge Rule That Is Also Likely to Reshape Legal Immigration

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 08, 2019.

The public-charge rule issued by the Trump administration in August 2019 will have profound effects on future immigration and on use of public benefits by millions of legal noncitizens and their U.S.-citizen family members. Complex standards for determining when an immigrant is likely to become a public charge could cause a significant share of the nearly 23 million noncitizens and U.S. citizens in benefits-using immigrant families to disenroll, as this commentary explains.

Rethinking U.S. Immigration Policy: New Realities Call for New Answers

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 08, 2019.

The U.S. immigration system is in desperate need of an overhaul. What has been missing is an alternate vision for a path forward that treats immigration as a strategic resource while also accounting for heightened security and rule-of-law imperatives, which together can further U.S. interests, values, and democratic principles as a society. This concept note outlines a new MPI initiative, Rethinking U.S. Immigration Policy, that seeks to fill this gap.

Chronicling Migration in the 21st Century Through One Family's Journey

By Migration Policy Institute from Migration Policy Institute. Published on Aug 06, 2019.

Welcome

Welcome to the Centre for the Study of Global Human Movement

The Centre for the Study of Global Human Movement aims to build on strong institutional engagement by the University with one of the greatest societal challenges of the 21st Century, that of human movement, dispersal, mobility, and migration to create a transdisciplinary centre of research excellence.

 We do hope you will get involved